How to Fix a Wrought Iron Fence So a Dog Cannot Go Through


Wrought-iron fences are often quaint and attractive. The fences are also attractive to smaller or midsized dogs, because they can walk between the bars of the fence. Larger dogs, having an unobstructed view between the bars, may try to walk through the gaps and get stuck. It's not the best fence for a family with a dog, but removing and replacing it is very costly. If you can't change the fence, you can add to it so that your dog is protected.

What You'll Need
  • Tape measure
  • Plastic or wire fencing roll
  • Zip ties
  • Assistant
  • Wire cutter 
  • Spray paint


Step 1
Measure the length and height of the wrought-iron fence. Buy at least that length of wire mesh fencing of a suitable height. Measure the height of the wrought-iron fence, from the topmost horizontal bar to the ground, to get the height for your mesh fencing. Determine the best fencing to use for your dog. You may be able to use chicken wire for a small, sedate dog. For a particularly rambunctious dog, use chain-link fencing, although it's harder to work with.

Step 2

Attach the mesh fencing to the wrought-iron fence, a small section at a time, with your assistant helping to hold the mesh in place tightly. Use the horizontal bars on the fence when attaching your zip ties, so the mesh doesn't sag or fall down. Place the zip tie at the top of the topmost horizontal bar and wrap it around the horizontal bar and a vertical bar. Continue using zip ties to attach the mesh fencing to the topmost horizontal bar.

Step 3
Stretch the mesh fencing as taut as possible, and zip tie it to the bottommost horizontal bar, just as you did with the topmost bar.

Step 4
Place zip ties as tightly as possible in two or three places between the top and bottom ties, again, as tightly as possible. If there are horizontal bars in the middle, zip tie the mesh to those. If not, just make the ties as tight as possible on the vertical bars.

Step 5
Tug at the mesh fencing in many different places, checking that it's as tight as possible. There should be no give at all. Pull all tie straps tightly and cut the extra length as short as possible.

Step 6
Spray paint wrought iron, mesh and zip ties all the same color, using a paint made for outdoor use. If they are all the same color, the extra fencing will not be as noticeable.



Tips
  • If possible, just reinforce the back yard fence, to avoid ruining the look of the front of your house. 
  • If your wrought-iron fence is short enough that your dog can get over it, you will need plastic or wood lattice or sturdy-gauge chain link of the proper height. In most cases, these materials will be sturdy enough not to fall or sag. If not, place U-channel metal stakes at intervals of four feet, as close to the wrought iron as possible, and strap the top of the mesh to the stakes.
  • Place the mesh on the outside of the wrought iron (the side opposite where your dog will be), if your dog pulls, paws and chews to get out. If your dog tries to push its way out, then you'll need the reinforcement on the inside of the wrought iron.
  • Planting a very thick hedgerow will beautify the makeshift fencing, and provide added protection and privacy.
  • Bamboo shades could be used as an alternative material for a small dog if you strap them tightly to the wrought-iron.

Warnings
  • If the wrought-iron fence doesn't reach all the way to the ground, make sure the mesh fencing does, and reinforce it with a plywood panel or lattice on the bottom six inches or a foot.
  • An electric (invisible) dog fence is an option, however, it doesn't prevent other dogs and animals coming into your yard and some dogs will run through it if there is enough temptation outside the fence. It also requires training time before you can use it. If you try it, place the invisible fence about a foot or more inside the wrought-iron fence, so children aren't shocked by touching the fence.

For Further Reading

17 comments:

Dog Fence said...

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invisible fence battery said...

oh! These instructions are so useful! For women, it is advisable to ask help from the expert or any man in case you need some help

Karly Mittens said...

Great post! very informative, glad to come by your blog to know more of these tips. I surely going to use these method in my business.


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Abed Nadier said...

Great information! We were looking into getting a wrought iron fence but had second thoughts because of our dog. After reading this blog I think we're gonna go for it!

Thelma Bowman said...

Thanks for sharing this! If I may add, make sure that your ties are firm. Even though you used the most reliable and durable materials, everything would slip and put all your effort to waste if you it's not secure enough.

Thelma @QualityStrapping.com

Seamus Lowe said...

Thanks for this information. I've been trying to find out more about wrought iron fencing to see what I could do with it. I really need it for my business in Mississauga because my dog guards it. The fence isn't for him, he won't leave the property. It's for others to know not to come in.

Anonymous said...

Dog fencing comment. I have done this using the black pvc coated fencing, cheap and do not have to paint it.

Alena Mauer said...

Lucky I have a big dog so he can't squeeze through. I would hate to ruin the look of my wrought iron. I love it.

Alena | http://www.abfabrications.com/fences-gates-and-structural-steel

celine sanderson said...

This is going to help me not lose my dog so easily now! He always finds a way to jump over and run like a crazy creature into traffic. I really need to secure my chain link fence. These are such fantastic ideas, thanks!
Celine | http://www.qualitychainlinkfencing.ca/services.html

jordanjohnsonlj said...

I have been having this exact same problem with my dog. I would follow your recommendations exactly but I don't know what to do. You see, I have a cast iron fence. Would the process be similar for my type of fence? Thanks for your time. http://nwfence.com/ornamental-fences/1314066

Tylequious Jackson said...

I really want to have an iron fence put around my property. My grandparents have one, and I love the way it looks. I think that a black iron fence would really add to my home. I need to talk to the fencing companies in my area. They will be able to install an iron fence for me. http://www.trejosironworks.com

Nora Moore said...

That's true that we might have to alter our fence if we get a dog. We have been talking about it. Still, our bars are closer together than some fences I've seen, so it might not be a problem as long as we don't get a small dog. That's a good idea to make sure the wire mesh and wrought iron are the same color. It won't be as noticeable then. http://www.perthwroughtiron.com.au

Nora Moore said...

That's true that we might have to alter our fence if we get a dog. We have been talking about it. Still, our bars are closer together than some fences I've seen, so it might not be a problem as long as we don't get a small dog. That's a good idea to make sure the wire mesh and wrought iron are the same color. It won't be as noticeable then. http://www.perthwroughtiron.com.au

Dog Fences Outdoor Large said...

dogs, having an unobstructed view between the bars, may try to walk ... ldogfencesoutdoor.blogspot.com

Anonymous said...

I use zip tie method and plastic poultry fencing to place over the wrought iron since my little dog slipped through the rails. After time and money to have somebody put it up she ripped it down zip ties still attached to the fence.

john smith said...

an't wait to find out so I can start planning my projects around this one. Fencing Wholesalers